Hacktoberfest

I finally have a Github.com account.

I’ve been learning Git at work via an internal Gitlab installation for my Powershell/PHP scripts and it’s going quite well!

I have been told about Hacktoberfest – A few people I know have signed up and I thought “hey, why not give it a go?” It’s a perfect excuse to start contributing to projects I make use of, though I’m no coder I can probably do some documentation work, and maybe some basic Powershell stuff too if I’m feeling brave.

Eventually I’d like to put some personal projects on there, give back to the world a little bit, but for now I’ll just be logging issues or fixing small easy problems in other peoples repos 😀

You never know, I might get a T-shirt!

Behind the Times? Git Gud

I’ve recently decided to learn Git.

Yes yes I know, I’m over a decade late to the party. I haven’t taken a look at source control since I first played with SVN many (many) moons ago. I haven’t bothered for a few reasons. Mainly, I’ve not had a use for it. Though I have written some scripts for work and whatnot, I’ve not needed the collaborative advantages of using the tool, and neither have I really needed the version control side either.

Don’t get me wrong, it probably would have been useful, however I’ve not missed it or wanted the features it boasts until recently.

However, times are a-changin’. Some of the techs at work have started using my scripts over the last year and they’re beginning to identify issues or quirks which I would ignore or didn’t encounter. I wrote these scripts, so I know how to use them almost instinctively. These issues just don’t show their head for me, or when they do it’s sort-of by design and I don’t hesitate to work around it.

Since I’m now making small changes sporadically, and looking ahead I’m beginning to automate even more things now that I have a slither of free time occasionally, I’ve decided to jump head first into Git.

I’ve built an Ubuntu 18.04 VM at work and installed GitLab onto it. (Slight tangent, but their installation guides are very good.)

The Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery stuff fascinates me, but I’ve disabled them from running on each project by default as I need to focus on learning Git first. I’m eager to learn more about this, though.

I’m going to make you cringe, but I’ve opted to use a GUI front end for my machine instead of relying on the CLI. This is because it seems to be a bit of a pain in the ass to run CLI git on a Windows machine (we’re a Windows network) and, although I will learn the commands eventually, I want to focus on the best practises of using Git rather than mess about with the command line syntax. The syntax is very simple, but I don’t trust my brain to remember it right now.

I’ve chosen to use the GitHub GUI for now. It works pretty well. I’ve moved six of my currently active scripts (all powershell) onto GitLab and have pushed commits to the projects.

I’ve also created a project for our network switch configs. I don’t know if this is something GitLab can do or if some other kind of automatic deployment technology is needed, but it’d be cool to make a change to the repository and for that change to be automagically applied to the relevant hardware. I can think of ways to script that myself, but is there a purpose built tool out there?

I’ve got lots of questions to ask and lots of avenues to explore. For now, though, I’m keeping it simple with version control & branching.

I’m considering eventually creating a public GitHub repo to put code out into the world. It would take some work to de-work-ify the existing scripts and remove any workplace data, but I could also eventually upload these scripts, too.